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Accomidations

aboutpageFor the Spring Task Force Summit, ALEC has reserved a block of rooms at a special rate for May 1st and 2nd at the Kansas City Marriott Downtown. This will be the location of our meetings and the Kansas City Reception. The highly discounted rate of $149 per night (plus tax) will only be available until April 4th, unless the room block sells out before this date. Don’t wait to reserve your rooms today! The Kansas City Marriott Downtown connects travelers and visitors to the heart of KC’s entertainment district. The nearby Power & Light District offers shopping, great restaurants, and a vibrant nightlife.Upcoming entertainment includes Bill Cosby at the Midland Theatre; Jason Aldean and Kings of Leon at the Sprint Center; and Tony DeSare at the Kauffman Center. KC Chiefs football, the KC Zoo, Nelson-Atkins Museum, jazz and blues clubs, and shopping at Crown Center and the Country Club Plaza are minutes away. This premier convention hotel has a new lobby and two distinct towers: the Marriott Tower and the Muehlebach Tower which offer 983 luxury guest rooms and nearly 100,000 sq. ft. of diverse function space. The Downtown Kansas City Marriott Hotel is THE choice for business events and weddings, and is KC’s most popular venue for civic and social galas.

 

 
Kansas City Marriott Downtown

200 West 12th Street

Kansas City, Missouri 64105 USA

Check-in and Check-out

  • Check-in: 3:00PM
  • Check-out: 12:00PM
  • Express Check-In and Express Checkout

Internet Access

  • Guest rooms: Wireless
    • Complimentary High Speed: Check email + browse the Web
    • Enhanced High Speed: Video chat, download large files + stream video for 9.95 USD/day
  • Lobby and public areas: Complimentary Wireless
  • Meeting rooms: Wireless

 
Kansas City Marriott Downtown 200 West 12th Street Kansas City, Missouri 64105 USA Check-in and Check-out

  • Check-in: 3:00PM
  • Check-out: 12:00PM
  • Express Check-In and Express Checkout

Internet Access

  • Guest rooms: Wireless
    • Complimentary High Speed: Check email + browse the Web
    • Enhanced High Speed: Video chat, download large files + stream video for 9.95 USD/day
  • Lobby and public areas: Complimentary Wireless
  • Meeting rooms: Wireless

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Frequently Asked Questions

questionsEarly Registration Cut-Off: April 4, 2014 Housing Cut-Off: April 4, 2014 1. Where can I find the registration forms? The registration forms can be found under the registration section on the main meetings homepage. 2. Can my spouse attend the meeting? Yes, the fee for this is $50. Spouse / guest registration is meant to accommodate legal spouses and immediate family members. Attendees from the same organization must register independently. No exceptions will be made. Spouse / guest designation will be clearly visible on name badge. 3. Can I cancel my reservation? Yes, however, registrations cancelled prior to 5:00pm EST April 4, 2014 are subject to a $100 cancellation fee. Registrations are non-refundable after 5:00pm EST April 4, 2014. All refund requests must be made in writing and sent via email to meetings@alec.org. Registration fees may be transferred from one registrant to another. Please send a transfer request in writing via email to meetings@alec.org. 4. Where will the meeting take place? Kansas City Marriott Downtown 200 West 12th Street Kansas City, MO 64105 5. Can I stay at the hotel? Yes, please see the hotel information tab on the meetings homepage. We have negotiated a highly discounted group rate and would encourage you to stay at the Kansas City Marriott Downtown for your convenience. 6. Will I be able to cancel my hotel reservation? Yes, Credit cards will be charged one night room and tax in the event of a no show or if cancellation occurs within 72 hours prior to arrival. This includes any reservations that ALEC may have offered on a complimentary basis. All changes and/or cancellations must be made directly with the hotels. Please obtain a cancellation number when your reservation is cancelled. 7. Can I register for Annual Meeting at Spring Task Force Summit? Yes, we will have a registration table available for Annual Meeting registration. 8. What events can I attend if I am not a voting member of a Task Force? Any registered attendee is permitted to sit in and observe the Task Force luncheons and meetings. There is a designated area for non-voting members in each room. 9. Are there sponsorship opportunities available? Yes, please contact a member of our development team to learn more. 10. What is the closet airport to the hotel? The closet airport is Kansas City International (airport code, MCI). Please note, this airport is in Kansas City, Kansas however, Kansas City, MO shares the same airport as the two cities are a short distance from each other. The ALEC meeting will be in Kansas City, MO. Due to the schedule of events, it is recommend that you fly in on Thursday evening and out on Saturday morning. 11. How can I get to the hotel from the airport? There will be a “Super Shuttle” available with a discounted rate. You can make reservations at the following number or link……… The airport also has taxis available outside of the baggage claim area. Super Shuttle Information……. 12. Will taxis be available at the hotel? Yes, there are taxis available outside the hotel. 13. Are there restaurants within walking distance of the hotel? Yes, the hotel is close to the Power & Light district which has many restaurant options. Here are some we recommend……LINK 14. Will the meeting have events on Saturday? No, there will be no events on Saturday after the meeting. The meeting will conclude on Friday at 7:00pm and 9:00pm for Board members. 15. Will there be an exhibit hall at the meeting? No, we do not have an exhibit hall at this meeting. Please contact Brendan Barber at bbarber@alec.org for information on exhibiting at Annual Meeting 2014.

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Visit KC

 

Visit KC Downtown Kansas City is a unique urban experience; a destination for visual arts, sports, performing arts, theater, cultural amenities, cinema, entertainment and dining is unrivaled in the region. The greater Downtown area encompasses 10 neighborhoods which features a diverse and vibrant variety of tastes, treats and beats. Downtown has become the hip place to live, work, dine and play. In the words of Austin Powers, it is simply “groovy, baby.” Greater Downtown features the largest arts district (Crossroads) and entertainment district (Power & Light) in the Midwest. It boasts of the 3rd busiest arena in the U.S. and the 6th busiest worldwide (Sprint Center). There are more concert venues (6), theater stages (6), performing arts stages (3), art galleries and studioes (75), museums (11) than anywhere else in the region. Plus, it boasts of the coolest, state-of-the-art movie theater in the world (AMC Mainstreet).

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About

aboutpagea nonpartisan membership association for free market state lawmakers who shared a common belief in limited government, free markets, federalism, and individual liberty. Their vision and initiative resulted in the creation of a voluntary membership association for people who believed that government closest to the people was fundamentally more effective, more just, and a better guarantor of freedom than the distant, bloated federal government in Washington, D.C. At that meeting, in September 1973, state legislators, including then Illinois State Rep. Henry Hyde, conservative activist Paul Weyrich, and Lou Barnett, a veteran of then Gov. Ronald Reagan’s 1968 presidential campaign, together with a handful of others, launched the American Legislative Exchange Council. Among those who were involved with ALEC in its formative years were: Robert Kasten and Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin; John Engler of Michigan; Terry Branstad of Iowa, and John Kasich of Ohio, all of whom moved on to become governors or members of Congress. Congressional members who were active during this same period included Senators John Buckley of New York and Jesse Helms of North Carolina, and Congressmen Phil Crane of Illinois and Jack Kemp of New York. The concept of ALEC task forces dates back to the early days of the first Reagan administration when, in 1981, the President formed a national Task Force on Federalism, which was headed by U.S. Senator Paul Laxalt of Nevada. Also on the President’s Task Force was ALEC National Chairman Tom Stivers of Idaho. The President’s Task Force on Federalism would come to rely heavily upon members of ALEC for expert testimony. Then State Senator John Kasich of Ohio and Senate President Robert Monier of New Hampshire regularly met in front of the committee. As a result of the interaction between ALEC members and Reagan Administration officials, ALEC established seven first-generation Task Forces, then called Cabinet Task Forces, which worked directly with the administration on policy development issues. Almost immediately, the impact of this interaction was evident: In 1981, ALEC published and distributed 10,000 copies of Reagan and the States, detailing methods for decentralizing government from the federal to the state level. In 1982, ALEC began developing its first health care initiatives. In 1983, ALEC responded to the Reagan Administration’s landmark study, A Nation at Risk, with a two-part report on Education which laid the blame for the nation’s educational decline squarely where it belonged-on centralization, declining values, and an increasingly liberal social agenda that had pervaded schools since the 1960s-and which offered such “radical” ideas as a voucher system, merit pay for teachers and higher academic and behavioral standards for students as possible solutions to the problems. After much success with policy formation and education, in 1986, ALEC made a commitment to form formal internal Task Forces to develop policy covering virtually every responsibility of state government. Within a year, nearly a dozen ALEC Task Forces had been formed, and they quickly become policy powerhouses. By 1987, the newly-formed Civil Justice Task Force developed the first comprehensive response to the nation’s frivolous litigation explosion; the Health Care Task Force had developed policies on medical savings accounts, a concerted strategy for reassessing mandated coverage, and a comprehensive response to the growing AIDS crisis. And the Telecommunications Task Force became second-to-none in the development of groundbreaking ideas in the face of rapid-fire technological advances and efforts to regulate them.

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Contact

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